Nikolaustag
St. Nikolaus Day
is Dec 6th in Germany


In Germany, the 6th of December is an important day for children.On the evening of December 5th , children place a boot or shoe outside their bedroom doors, hoping that Nikolaus will fill it with presents and candy. According to folklore, St. Nikolaus will appear overnight and put little gifts into their boots if they have been `good` throughout the year. `Bad` kids will only receive a bunch of twigs (a birch). Traditional St. Nikolaus gifts include apples, oranges, Christmas cookies, specially wrapped candy, and small toys.

Saint Nicholas was renowned for his great kindness and his generous aid to those in distress. Among the kind and miraculous acts attributed to him are saving three young girls from prostitution by secretly providing them with dowries, raising three murdered boys from the dead, and saving sailors caught in stormy seas. For these reasons, he is considered the patron saint of children, unmarried girls, and sailors, among others.

Sometimes someone dressed as St. Nikolaus comes to the door to inquire about the behavior of the children.

St Nikolaus of Myra was a popular saint in German history. Here is more about him .

 

More about St. Nicholas Day
from Gert Reitner

 

"Nikolausstiefel"

Simone Jahrling commented on the German Goodies Facebook page says The Stiefel(boot) with goodies was enough for us:-)

"Nikolausstiefel" (St. Nikolaus` boots) made out of plastic, which are sold in all major German grocery stores. They are available empty, or filled with candy. St. Nikolaus is said to resemble Santa Claus, hence the red and fur-trimmed boots (usually cotton).

 

Spekulatius

Cheryl Frey, added that Spekulatius cookies are traditionaly baked for St, Nikolaus celebration.

There are two theories about where the name Spekulatius originated. The first theory states that the name came from the Latin word Speculum , meaning "mirror." It refers to the wooden cookie mold that imparts its design onto the cookie. The second theory states that the name comes from the Latin word Speculator , meaning "bishop", "overseer", or "supervisor." The connection here is that Speculatius and Speculator sound most similiar.

Here is a recipe

 

Order Spekulatius from
Germandeli.com

More Brands of Spekulatius

 

 

 


Keeping your Nikolausgifts safe from the Pets

Regine Tölke-Tollefsen
shared this picture of how they Dog Proof Nikolaustag for the event.

Sometimes in the City Folks Keep their
Boots and Shoes Inside.

6th December is Nikolaustag, or Nicholas Day in Germany. It's part of the pre-Christmas traditions and is taken very seriously. It begins the night before. Children clean their winter boots and leave them outside their front doors. Inside the boots they place a list of everything they want for Christmas, which is written in their best handwriting.

During the night Nikolaus comes and collects all the lists, leaving small gifts in their place. If the child has been good, they will find nuts, oranges, apples, chocolates and perhaps a small toy in their boots. But if they have been bad, they will find twigs and a piece of coal.

At work, colleagues will often leave chocolates, or other specially wrapped candies on each others desks on the morning of Nikolaustag. Some companies also choose  to have their Christmas parties on 6th December.

courtesy of the Waldiland Blogspot

 

 

Who is Krampus ???????

Krampus is a devilish looking creature that often accompanies St Nikolaus when he visits children on the night of Dec 5.

St. Niklolaus leaves the punishment of naughty children to Krampus. This usually amounts to coal or a twig in the child's shoe.

Sometimes the kids are told if you are naughty Krampus will take you in his sack back to his lair for Christmas dinner.

 

More about Krampus here

 

 

Video of a Visit by St. Nikolaus and Krampus

 

 

 

E-Mail The Webmaster stephen@kitchenproject.com
© 1998 to present
The Kitchen Project 

This page was updated
November 29, 2012

Privacy Policy
and Terms of Use